Professor Richard Chused

Professor of Law

Professor Richard Chused

Professor of Law

Biography

[From Professor Chused’s Faculty Profile at New York Law School]

PROFESSOR RICHARD CHUSED is a prolific scholar and an expert on property law, gender and American legal history, copyright law, and cyberlaw. He joined the New York Law School faculty in 2008 after spending thirty-five years teaching and writing at the Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, DC. During 2004–05, he received a Senior Scholar Fulbright Grant to teach at the Law Faculty of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. From 2009 to 2011 he served on a Peer Review Committee that made recommendations on grant applications for the Fulbright Program in the Middle East. Professor Chused also is a member of various history and legal history associations. He served on the Board of Governors of the Society of American Law Teachers for twelve years and as its webmaster for ten.

He has published numerous books and articles on property, copyright and family law, the legal history of gender and property law, and teaching texts in copyright and property. His recent published work includes The Legal Culture of Appropriation Art: The Future of Copyright in the Remix Age in which he recommends substantial revisions of copyright law, a history of Marini v. Ireland—the best known New Jersey landlord-tenant reform case, the third edition of his property text book published by Lexis, Mt. Laurel: Hindsight is 20-20, an article contending that the famous land-use case was in some ways wrongly decided, Courts and Temperance “Ladies”, a legal history piece about temperance women and their experiences in the courts of Ohio in the 1870s, Impoverished Tenants in Twentieth Century America, a chapter in a comparative law anthology on landlord-tenant law, the definitive history of the famous landlord-tenant case Javins v. First National Realty Corporation, and an historical essay on Myra Bradwell’s Chicago Legal News. He is presently working on a large text on gender and law in American history scheduled for publication in the near future and an article on the propriety of displaying photographs taken surreptitiously of people through the windows of their living quarters.

For more information, please visit the faculty profile page at the New York Law School. 

All session by Professor Richard Chused